Public Opinion After Islamic State

February 15, 2023 (Wednesday) / 5:30 pm7:00 pm

Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion, 6th floor
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Van Pelt Library, 3420 Walnut Street
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Public Opinion After Islamic State

The Arab Barometer Project and the Remaking of Heritage in Mosul and Aleppo

Amaney A. Jamal

Dean, Princeton School of Public and International Affairs; Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Politics; Professor of Politics and International Affairs; Princeton University

Lynn Meskell

Richard D. Green Professor of Anthropology in the School of Arts and Sciences, Professor in the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, and Curator in the Middle East and Asia sections at the Penn Museum

Michael Robbins

Project Director, Arab Barometer, Princeton University

Presented by Penn’s Middle East Center

Arab Barometer is a non-partisan research network that has been conducting public opinion surveys in the Middle East and North Africa since 2006, providing insight into the social, political, and economic attitudes of ordinary citizens in the Arab world. Join two of its leading scholars, Professor Amaney Jamal and Dr. Michael Robbins, as they share recent work in Iraq and Syria, where they have been surveying the attitudes of local communities to understand better how to handle heritage reconstruction in a way that is meaningful and sensitive to community concerns.

The conversation will be moderated by Professor Lynn Meskell, Penn Integrates Knowledge (PIK) Professor in Anthropology and History Preservation, who has worked closely on the project with Jamal and Robbins.

Cosponsored by the Global Islamic Studies Program and Wolf Humanities Center.


Amaney A. Jamal is the Dean of the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, the Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Politics, and Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. Jamal also directs the Workshop on Arab Political Development and the Bobst-AUB Collaborative Initiative. She is the former President of the Association of Middle East Women’s Studies (AMEWS). The focus of her current research is on the drivers of political behavior in the Arab world, Muslim immigration to the US and Europe, and the effect of inequality and poverty on political outcomes. Jamal is co-principal investigator of the Arab Barometer Project, winner of the Best Dataset in the Field of Comparative Politics (Lijphart/Przeworski/Verba Dataset Award 2010); co-PI of the Detroit Arab American Study, a sister survey to the Detroit Area Study; and senior advisor on the Pew Research Center projects focusing on Islam in America (2006) Global Islam (2010) and Islam in America (2017). Ph.D. University of Michigan. In 2005, Jamal was named a Carnegie Scholar. 


Lynn Meskell is Richard D. Green Professor of Anthropology in the School of Arts and Sciences, Professor in the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, and Curator in the Middle East and Asia sections at the Penn Museum. Meskell is currently A.D. White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University (2019–2025). She holds Honorary Professorships at Oxford University and Liverpool University in the UK, Shiv Nadar University, India, and the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. Previously, Meskell was the Shirley and Leonard Ely Professor of Humanities and Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. She is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. Over the past twenty years, she has been awarded grants and fellowships including those from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Australian Research Council, the American Academy in Rome, the School of American Research, Oxford University, and Cambridge University. She is the founding editor of the Journal of Social Archaeology. Meskell has broad theoretical interests including socio-politics, archaeological ethics, global heritage, materiality, as well as feminist and postcolonial theory.


Michael Robbins is Director and Co-Principal Investigator, Arab Barometer. He has been a part of the project since its inception and serving as director since 2014. He has led or overseen more than 100 surveys in international contexts and is a leading expert in survey methods on ensuring data quality. His work on Arab public opinion, political Islam, and political parties has been published in Comparative Political Studies, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, and the Journal of Democracy and Foreign Affairs. He received the American Political Science Association Aaron Wildavsky Award for the Best Dissertation in the field of Religion and Politics.